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Asset Recovery in Eurasia: Repatriation or Repay the Patron?

  • 562 Dirksen Senate Office Building (map)

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following briefing:

ASSET RECOVERY IN EURASIA
Repatriation or Repay the Patron?

Wednesday, February 13, 2019
10:00 a.m.
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room 562

Live Webcast: www.facebook.com/HelsinkiCommission

Asset recovery—the process of repatriating funds previously stolen by corrupt officials—remains one of the most contentious points in the fight against transnational corruption. Though only a small percentage of stolen funds are ever recovered, major questions exist about the best ways to ensure that repatriated funds don’t simply reenter the same patronage cycle from which they came. Is it possible to ensure that recovered assets actually serve the people from whom they have been stolen?

This briefing will explore approaches to repatriation in Armenia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan. Panelists will discuss best practices and challenges in asset recovery as well as appropriate policy responses, both by the state in question and the international community, and compare the respective approaches of the three countries.

The following panelists are scheduled to participate:

  • Sona Ayvazyan, Executive Director, Transparency International Armenia

  • Bryan Earl, Retired Supervisory Special Agent/Assistant General Counsel, Federal Bureau of Investigation

  • Karen Greenaway, Retired Supervisory Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investigation

  • Kristian Lasslett, Professor of Criminology and Head of School, Ulster University
     

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The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the U.S. Helsinki Commission, is an independent agency of the Federal Government charged with monitoring compliance with the Helsinki Accords and advancing comprehensive security through promotion of human rights, democracy, and economic, environmental and military cooperation in 57 countries. The Commission consists of nine members from the U.S. Senate, nine from the House of Representatives, and one member each from the Departments of State, Defense, and Commerce.